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Synopsis

Chasing Daylight is a book that will resonate with anyone who is on a fast-paced career path. Eugene O'Kelly, the previous CEO and chairman of the large accounting firm, KPMG, was diagnosed with brain cancer at 53. He was given three months to live, and this is the story of his final days and how he chose to live them. He takes readers along for the experience through his downward spiral, from diagnosis to the process of dying.

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'Chasing Daylight' depicts the process of coming to terms with a terminal illness diagnosis through the personal journey of Eugene O'Kelly, the former CEO of KPMG. After being diagnosed with brain cancer and given three months to live, O'Kelly shares his experiences from diagnosis to the process of dying. The book provides a raw and intimate look into his final days and how he chose to live them.

Some other books that explore the theme of legacy in the context of a high-stress career include 'The Last Lecture' by Randy Pausch, 'When Breath Becomes Air' by Paul Kalanithi, and 'Tuesdays with Morrie' by Mitch Albom. These books, like , delve into the experiences of individuals facing life-altering situations and how they choose to spend their remaining time, often reflecting on their careers and the legacies they will leave behind.

'Chasing Daylight' explores the theme of legacy through the story of Eugene O'Kelly, the former CEO of KPMG, who was diagnosed with brain cancer and given three months to live. The book chronicles his final days and how he chose to live them, providing a profound exploration of legacy as O'Kelly reflects on his life, his choices, and the impact he has had on others. It serves as a reminder that our legacy is not just about our professional achievements, but also about our personal relationships and the way we choose to live our lives, especially when faced with our own mortality.

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O'Kelly's story recounts the steps he took to simplify his life and how he learned "to be in the present moment, how to live there at least for snippets of time." This is a story of how someone faces death purposefully with retrospection and resolution.

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Summary

O'Kelly attained his professional success after he landed his dream job as CEO of KPMG. He was happily married to a woman he loved, had a daughter he adored, and seemed to be living a life that many would aspire to for themselves. Yet, when he was told that he only had three months to live, O'Kelly said he "felt blessed."

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Some other books that discuss the concept of embracing the present moment in the face of a terminal illness include 'Tuesdays with Morrie' by Mitch Albom, 'The Last Lecture' by Randy Pausch, and 'When Breath Becomes Air' by Paul Kalanithi.

There are numerous stories of people who have faced the end of their life with grace and dignity. Some notable examples include Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon who gave a famous 'Last Lecture' after being diagnosed with terminal cancer; Paul Kalanithi, a neurosurgeon who wrote the memoir 'When Breath Becomes Air' as he faced a terminal lung cancer diagnosis; and Morrie Schwartz, a sociology professor whose end-of-life conversations with former student Mitch Albom became the best-selling book 'Tuesdays with Morrie'.

Some other books that discuss the concept of finding joy in the midst of suffering include 'Man's Search for Meaning' by Viktor E. Frankl, 'The Book of Joy' by Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu, and 'When Breath Becomes Air' by Paul Kalanithi.

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O'Kelly explains that the diagnosis and the wake-up call of his impending death inspired him to "unwind" his relationships. He saw his situation as a chance to finally take a step back and see his life from a unique perspective. The result of this different view was the realization that he needed closure and completeness in his relationships with family, friends, and colleagues. O'Kelly had been given the gift of knowing how much time he had left on this earth and to self-reflect and focus on the things that mattered most to him.

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A terminal illness diagnosis can significantly affect one's relationship with friends. It can serve as a wake-up call, prompting one to reassess their relationships and seek closure or completeness. This can lead to a deeper understanding and appreciation of these relationships, as one becomes more aware of the limited time they have left. However, it can also lead to strain or tension, as friends may struggle to cope with the reality of the situation.

One way to find closure in relationships after a terminal illness diagnosis is to use the situation as an opportunity to reflect on your life and relationships. This can lead to a realization of the need for closure and completeness in relationships with family, friends, and colleagues. Knowing how much time you have left can allow you to focus on the things that matter most to you, and to seek closure in your relationships.

A terminal illness diagnosis can significantly affect one's relationship with colleagues. It can lead to a shift in perspective, prompting one to seek closure and completeness in their relationships. This includes relationships with colleagues, as they are a significant part of one's life. The individual may start to value these relationships more, seek to resolve any outstanding issues, and focus on creating meaningful interactions.

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Once the shock of his unexpected diagnosis had settled in, O'Kelly and his wife, Corinne, put together a plan for living his last three months as fully as possible. The attention to detail and the thoroughness of their approach to death allowed him to fill his remaining time with meaning, substance, and joy. The tears and pain eventually led to acceptance, allowing O'Kelly the rare opportunity to design the end of his life on his terms.

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Some other books that provide a personal perspective on dealing with terminal illness include 'The Death of Ivan Ilyich' by Leo Tolstoy, 'Tuesdays with Morrie' by Mitch Albom, and 'The Last Lecture' by Randy Pausch. These books offer profound insights into the human condition when faced with the inevitability of death, and they explore themes of acceptance, meaning, and the value of life.

O'Kelly's approach to his final months had a profound impact on those around him. His meticulous planning and acceptance of his situation allowed him to live his remaining time with meaning, substance, and joy. This not only brought him peace but also comforted those around him, knowing that he was living his last days on his own terms.

There are numerous stories of people who have faced their mortality with courage. For instance, Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer and used his last months to deliver inspirational lectures and write a book, 'The Last Lecture', about achieving your childhood dreams. Similarly, Paul Kalanithi, a neurosurgeon, wrote 'When Breath Becomes Air', a memoir about his life and illness, confronting death with integrity and grace. Another example is Morrie Schwartz, a sociology professor, who shared his thoughts and life lessons on dying in the book 'Tuesdays with Morrie' by Mitch Albom.

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"But if you start to live in the present now, not only do you get to enjoy it (which is huge), but you also prepare yourself for the future, which someday will be your present, breathing in your face."

As for those considering taking the time someday to plan their final weeks and months, three words of advice, he advises: "Move it up." This sound advice is something that anyone should take to heart because it comes from someone who knows. O'Kelly left his job, took his focus away from the future, and cast away a lifetime of habits. He was determined to create a new perspective and turn his death into a final, meaningful success.

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O'Kelly's account of his final days captures the common mortality everyone shares. His unique perspective on the Type A personality reveals the tendency for driven professionals to think they have everything under control. It's only when someone comes face to face with their mortality are they able to see their life clearly, maybe for the first time. This clarity often brings an abrupt change in priorities and focus.

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The story reinforces an adage that is all too familiar: People spend so much time building wealth and creating material successes that their personal relationships become secondary. O'Kelly shares his end-of-life revelations in a way that should give anyone their own wake-up call. He writes with emotion and insight about his transformation from fearing death to accepting it. He shares how his renewed focus on the truly important things in his life changed his life for the better while facing the inevitable.

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